Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Nine Calla Lilies and One Fox Tale

Nothing like red. I use Amaco Velvet Bright Red and put it on thick. After a bisque firing, I will lightly stain this piece with red iron oxide/gerstley borate wash making it rustier and deeper in tone---although I think I may leave the fox's face really bright red. Last, I will add a black nose and around the deeper recesses Duncan Cobalt Jet Black watered down, to add dimensionality--shadows. I don't really "read" a story on this piece. For some reason I wanted a fox and nine calla lilies. The story teller who holds this fox has such an exasperated look on her face that I will wait till it comes out of kiln to take a photo. Perhaps by then with a bit of fire, the story will emerge.

7 comments:

  1. At first I didn't see the fox, he looks so cute popping out the calla lilies; can't wait to see the finished piece. when I saw the title I thought of foxtails the weed, the ones that get stuck in everything they touch and can get embedded in dogs ears and have to be surgically removed.

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    1. Funny what pops up. Japanese folk tales say more tails (up to 9) on the spirit fox, the more wise. Also kitsune can change into or appear as a woman. My little fox has only one tail as it is a kit.

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  2. Great piece and I also love red! That red faced fox looks like he might have gotten into the 'story-tellers' lilies. The victorian meaning of the calla lily represents youth or rebirth - a fitting flower for your storyteller to hold with the young fox. Love this piece and can't wait to see it finished.

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  3. Oh, I like that---a fox in the calla lilies! We could make up a grand story! Maybe the deer chased him into the lilies---deer won't go near them as they are bitterly poisonous---feeling he escaped from a good nipping by the deer, he is then plucked when She gathered calla lilies for market---oh my! what a dilemma. Okay...needs a little working.
    I didn't know the symbolism of the lily---it does seem apt. Callas grow wild on the Mendocino coast even though they aren't native. I have quite a few pieces to fire so maybe after Easter I'll post a few.

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    1. yay - you've run with the story and the fox thought he was so sly to get away from the deer . . .
      I just finished reading 'The Language of Flowers' and now I'm always looking up the meanings - some are quite interesting. I didn't realize the Callas were poisonous.
      Looking forward to seeing the piece after your firing.

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  4. The fox looks like a youngster, so perhaps that's why the storyteller has an exasperated look on her face... like most young ones, they wriggle and wriggle to get out of one's arms so they can go play :)

    The calla lily is very beautiful, but, extremely poisonous. I trust wild animals instincts when it comes to ingesting the wild herbs which are good for them, and inherently knowing those which to avoid.
    Perhaps wee foxy knows this...

    I love Amaco Velvets. Such wonderful glazes. AV Bright Red is very fitting. Can't wait to see what the kiln gods present - very excited to see this wonderful art piece, Charlene.

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    1. I watch the deer step gingerly around the calla lilies and daffodils, which are naturalized on the coast---they pop up every where. We have a native Pacific Coast Iris that they avoid, too. Seems most of the native flowering plants are not palatable.

      Amaco Velvets are nice, but I use them sparingly as they are expensive. It is all dependent on what texture or depth of color I want. They are so highly pigmented, when I get to the bottom of the jar, I add some terra sigillata and get a nice muted color. Waste not....:)

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